BING BONG Paintings by Sarah Staskauskas and Dean Styers

BING BONG Paintings by Sarah Staskauskas and Dean Styers

Keystone Art Space (map)

Opening reception August 17. 6-9pm

BING BONG!
Next-door neighbors on the zodiac chart, Dean and Sarah occupy very different
personal universes. A textbook Sagittarius, Sarah Staskauskas suffers fools gladly
and paints portraits that speak of unsolved and unspoken family trauma, not yet
forgotten in the eyes of her subjects. Many of whom are blood relations, the others
strangers long dead or yet to be met. Sarah respects all the ghouls as she pulls and
pushes them to the edges. Her compositions scrape space and pull focus between
luminescent eyes and cursed orthodontia.

Dean Styers is an Aquarius with a calculating heart who tolerates sentimentality like
a straight edge thug tolerates public drinking at an SS Decontrol show in ’82. Dean
gives us the results of the autopsies he’s performed on artifacts culled from the
suspect strata of pop culture. Few folk raised by the syndicated cartoons and sit-
coms of the 50s and 60s actually hate their tele-nannies. It would seem frame by
frame, cell by cell, Dean is double checking that calculating heart of his, making
certain his Aquarian veracity remains absolute.

Exhibited together, Sarah & Dean, who sometimes share a palette and pull from and
examine the past without pomp or self-consciousness, present differing and
dizzying views, nearly psychedelic in their straight jab simplicity.

Secret Head Trip/What Struck Me: Joe O'Neill

Secret Head Trip/What Struck Me: Joe O'Neill

Keystone Art Space (map)

Secret Head Trip is an ongoing series of abstractions created from text, reflecting an interest in language, lettering, typography and traditional sign painting that has informed my work for many years. Abstracting the text shifts the focus to the gesture of the hand-painted letterforms and eliminates the recognizable words and the associations, or any baggage they may carry with them. The intent is not to create a puzzle for the viewer to solve, though some may take it as a challenge.


What Struck Me is a show of paintings on paper, drawn from multiple sources: photos, events, conversations, memories, experiences, and the internet. These are meant to be faster, spontaneous, experimental. A way to stay in the moment artistically, paint more broadly, take chances, break out of routine. Some of the paintings are painted on top of others, paint from the newer works bleeding onto the paintings underneath, adding unpredictability to the finished works.